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Course Descriptions By Subject

 

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English

ENG 100 Children's Literature

Children’s Literature is a wide-ranging introductory course which includes the history of literature for children and a continuing discussion of the ways our culture and history have defined and created what children may or may not be and what they may or may not read, enjoy, or understand. Students will develop criteria for the selection and evaluation of literature for children at different developmental stages. Students will explore current debates in and around children’s literature, scholarship, classroom use, and publishing. This course features multicultural materials and touches on a variety of media, including film, cartoons, television, and print. Though many students who take the course are, or will be, working with children, the course addresses children’s literature from a literary perspective, discussing texts from theoretical as well as a pedagogical framework. A major aim of the class is to introduce students to recent and emerging authors in order to broaden familiarity with current material available to young people.
 

ENG 104 Introduction to Literature: Fiction

This course will present to the student a wide range of fiction from various time periods and cultures. Students will learn basic literary terminology, analyze and interpret texts, and discuss concepts that enhance appreciation of fiction. The course may include the short story and the novel or novella.
 

ENG 104_H Introduction to Literature: Fiction-Honors

This course will present to the student a wide range of fiction from various time periods and cultures. Course work will involve students in critical analysis, basic literary terminology, and concepts which will enhance appreciation of fiction. The course may include the short story and the novel or novella. May be offered online. This honors class delves deeper into course topics and requires a high level of student motivation; the pace may be faster than non-honors courses. See www.lanecc.edu/honors for information. Students cannot receive credit for both ENG 104 and ENG 104_H.
 

ENG 105 Introduction to Literature: Drama

This course will introduce students to a wide variety of world plays which may include classical Greek drama, Shakespeare, Noh theater, and modern works. Students will learn basic dramatic terminology, analyze and interpret texts, and discuss concepts that enhance appreciation of drama. The course may include informal performance or other creative approaches to drama.
 

ENG 105_H Introduction to Literature: Drama-Honors

This honors class delves deeper into course topics and requires a high level of student motivation; the pace may be faster than non-honors courses. See www.lanecc.edu/honors for information. This course is a reading, writing, and discussion course that features critical analysis and appreciation of a wide variety of world plays beginning with the classical Greek period and ending with works of today. Students cannot receive credit for both ENG 105_H and ENG 105.
 

ENG 106 Introduction to Literature: Poetry

In this course, students will experience a wide range of poetry from various time periods and cultures. Students will learn basic poetic terminology, analyze and interpret texts, and discuss concepts that enhance appreciation of poetry. Students may also engage in creative assignments.
 

ENG 106_H Introduction to Literature: Poetry-Honors

This course will present to the student a wide range of poetry from various time periods and cultures. Course work will involve students in the consideration of poetic technique and expression. Theme, structure, and style will be emphasized, as well as the elements of poetry. At the discretion of the Instructor, students may also be required to participate in creative writing assignments to gain insight into the nature of poetry. This honors class delves deeper into course topics and requires a high level of student motivation; the pace may be faster than non-honors courses. See www.lanecc.edu/honors for information. Students cannot receive credit for both ENG 106_H and ENG 106.
 

ENG 107 Survey of World Literature

Part of a two-term offering to acquaint students with representative works of important world writers, literary forms, and significant currents of thought. The class is intended primarily for students who aspire to a broad education and who want to expand their reading experience and interpretive skills. The material covers the ancient and medieval eras.
 

ENG 109 Survey of World Literature

Survey of World Literature is a two-term sequence to acquaint students with representative works of important world writers, literary forms, and significant currents of thought. The class is intended primarily for students who aspire to a broad education and who want to expand their reading experience and interpretive skills. The material covers the nineteenth century until the present day.
 

ENG 151 Black American Literature

This course will offer students an intense examination of and engagement with Black American authors. Students will analyze and respond to a wide variety of issues, critical questions, and perspectives regarding how to interpret and define the journey of African Americans and where this path might eventually lead. Students will read, critically engage, and respond to texts in a variety of literary genres as well as critical and theoretical texts.
 

ENG 194 Literature of Comedy

“Is comedy really tragedy plus time?” This course traces the historical and cultural development of canonical and popular works of comedy. We will develop a working definition of comedy for our times by exploring classic and contemporary theories of humor, laughter, and comedy in its social contexts. Texts range from ancient theories to contemporary social media contexts. Genres may include plays, essays, poems, fiction, film, social and streaming media, and comic arts. Themes include the changing role of comedy in societies, the role of gender, race, sexuality, class and audience in shaping what’s funny, and the conventions, mechanics and effects of jokes, tropes, and types.
 

ENG 201 Shakespeare

One scholar suggests that Shakespeare's works “remain the outward limit of human achievement"; they fascinate us because we "cannot catch up to them." Nevertheless, we will have fun running after them. This survey explores the works of Shakespeare, covering 3-5 plays and at least one sonnet each term. Instructors might divide the plays by theme, genre, or chronology. ENG 201 may include Romeo and Juliet.
 

ENG 203 Shakespeare

One scholar suggests that Shakespeare's works "remain the outward limit of human achievement"; they fascinate us because we "cannot catch up to them." Nevertheless, we will have fun running after them. This survey explores the works of Shakespeare, covering 3-5 plays and at least one sonnet each term. Instructors might divide the plays by theme, genre, or chronology. ENG 203 may include Hamlet and/or King Lear.
 

ENG 204 Survey of British Literature

Survey of British Literature is a two-term sequence to acquaint students with representative works of important British writers, literary forms, and significant currents of thought. The material for the first term was written prior to approximately 1785 BCE. Each course may introduce students to different methodological perspectives/lenses through which to read and interpret literary texts, and may include developing an understanding of the social, political and cultural contexts in which texts are produced and interpreted. Primary emphasis is on reading and engaging with the literary materials.
 

ENG 205 Survey of British Literature

Survey of British Literature is a two-term sequence to acquaint students with representative works of important British writers, literary forms, and significant currents of thought. The material for the second term was written after approximately 1785 BCE. Each course may introduce students to different methodological perspectives/lenses through which to read and interpret literary texts, and may include developing an understanding of the social, political and cultural contexts in which texts are produced and interpreted. Primary emphasis is on reading and engaging with the literary materials.
 

ENG 215 Latino/a Literature

This is an introductory course to Latinx literature that will examine some of the major issues that have influenced its development beginning with the contact between European and pre-Columbian cultures. Students will also read some of the major voices in Latin American literature in order to examine how their work anticipates many of the issues facing contemporary Latinx writers in the United States.
 

ENG 217 Reading, Writing and Digital Culture

This course combines research into the impact of 21st century technologies and new media on the study of literature and culture with the use of digital humanities methods to analyze texts and create new knowledge and new theoretical and ethical considerations and other developments in the field.
Recommended Prerequisite: College-level reading and writing skills
 

ENG 222 Literature and Gender

This course will examine representations and/or investigations of gender in literature. While some literature chosen for the course may thematically focus readers on the gender roles assigned to people at different points in time in relation to a given culture, other literature may examine the concept of gender itself. Students may consider relevant concepts from feminist theory and gender studies such as the difference between gender identity, gender expression, sex, and sexuality, as well as gender construction, performativity, and intersectionality.
 

ENG 232 Native American Literature, Myth and Folklore

This course provides an introduction to the oral traditional and formal written literature of Native American cultures through a wide variety of texts from different countries, tribes, regions, and individuals. Students will examine the world view expressed in the literature, the major thematic currents of oral and written Native American literature, the characteristics of Native American forms and traditions, and the characteristics it shares.
 

ENG 240 Nature Literature

Metá-kuye-ásin. All our relations. In this course we read essays and poems by writers who find home in the wilderness, desert, mountains, farms, prairies—and family in the plants and animals with which they live. Our readings ask us to consider who we are and how we should live—but their focus is on what it means to be part of this natural world. We read within and without the canon—delving into writers such as Thoreau, Evelyn White, Muir, Dillard, Silko, Erdrich, Berry, Abbey, Lopez, Leopold, Ackerman, and Kimmerer.
 

ENG 243 Native American Autobiography

This course will introduce students to a new way of seeing the world they live in as they read the lives of Native Americans written by themselves. Autobiographies studied will range from early historical works narrated and translated by anthropologists to modern works by Linda Hogan and N. Scott Momaday. These texts will be studied in their historical contexts, as well as their cultural contexts. Speakers and films will play an important role in this course. The goal of the class is to present a fuller picture of the voices and visions of Native Americans.
 

ENG 244 Asian American Literature

The course will familiarize students with literature from a variety of genres written by Asian American authors. The course may also engage students with materials written by American writers of Pacific Islander ancestry. Students will consider such literature in its aesthetic, historical, cultural, political, and social contexts. The class will also examine recurring themes regarding the development of attitudes, values, and identities as expressed within the body of literature.
 

ENG 250 Introduction to Folklore and Mythology

The nature and formal principles of studying folklore and myth will be introduced and illustrated through a variety of texts, folk artifacts, and thematic ideas, including world-wide examples that extend beyond Western cultures. Students will examine folkloric elements in their own and each other's backgrounds, as well as textbook examples of folklore and folk life from regional, ethnic, age, gender, or work groups. Students will consider how myth informs their own and each other's backgrounds, as well as examine textbook examples of myth and mythic themes, motifs, and archetypes from regional, ethnic, age, gender, or work groups. The course will introduce students to formal approaches to a variety of folklore and myths, as well as explore the relationship between myth, culture, and society. Folklore and myth will also be considered from a cross-cultural perspective.
 

ENG 253 Survey of American Literature

This course acquaints students with representative works of important American writers, literary forms, and significant currents of thought. Primary emphasis is on reading and engaging with the literary materials, with an introduction to practices of literary interpretation. Questions of genre, authorship, aesthetics, and literary movements may be examined in their relationships to social, political, and intellectual movements of the United States. The course will draw on material produced prior to the American Civil War period.
 

ENG 254 Survey of American Literature

This course acquaints students with representative works of important American writers, literary forms, and significant currents of thought. Primary emphasis is on reading and engaging with the literary materials, with an introduction to practices of literary interpretation. Questions of genre, authorship, aesthetics, and literary movements may be examined in their relationships to social, political, and intellectual movements of the United States. The course will draw on material produced after the American Civil War period.
 

ENG 257 The American Working Class in Fiction and Non-Fiction

Using the concept of the "American Dream" to examine work, class, and social mobility, students will learn to appreciate the power of class in shaping individual lives and our culture. There is a prevailing belief in America that we are a "classless" society, but this course interrogates this concept. Through critical examination of a variety of works of fiction and non-fiction, students will explore ways that the inequalities of class, ethnicity, race, and gender interrelate to sustain the power and interests of economic elites.
 

ENG 260 Introduction to Women Writers

This course will introduce students to the richness and variety of literary works written by women over the course of several centuries. Issues that concern women writers, the impact of stories, and how class, race, and gender work to construct the stories we live by will be central to the course. Critical thinking will play a role as students consider literature written by a range of women writers in a global context. The course will include an introduction to feminist literary theory and will introduce students to a variety of literary genres and styles.
 

ENG 261 Science Fiction

This course examines science fiction from a diverse range of time periods, authors, subgenres, and forms. Students will understand science fiction as engaging with both the realities of the present and the possibilities of the future, taking seriously not only its status as a literary genre but also the social, political, and philosophical questions it raises.
 

ENG 270 Bob Dylan: American Poet

All winners of the Nobel Prize in Literature deserve a course of their own, perhaps—but only Bob Dylan has one at Lane. In 2016 the Nobel Committee awarded Dylan the prize "for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition." In this literature course, we examine the relationship between texts and the traditions from which they sprout: Dylan’s masterful songs have deep roots in American blues, English and American folk songs, British Romantic poetry, and even Greek and Roman classics. How poems work, the relationship between sound/song and lyrics, and the possibilities of meaning in Dylan’s work are our main themes.
 

ENG 282 Introduction to Comics and Graphic Novels

This course introduces students to the academic study of comics and graphic novels, focusing on these forms as literary productions, asking questions about how and why these forms are written and read. Students will encounter a variety of comics and graphic novel forms with an international, historical, and critical perspective on the art of editorial cartoons, comics, comic books, and graphic novels and how they communicate, inform, and emotionally engage audiences.
 
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